I finally got out on one of the new WTB tires today.  Three and half hours of pavement, sand, gravel, rocks, rocks on top of rocks, more rocks, and a little cactus.  Did I mention rocks?

Riding in El Paso demands tires that can resist sidewall cuts, big thorns, and sharp rocks that can puncture the center of the tire casing.  I took the Stout out for a spin today mounted up to the WTB Dual Duty rim up front.  Since I was going to be putting in about 45 minutes on the pavement, I left the ExiWolf on the rear.  The knobs on the Stout are huge and widely spaced.  So I ran the tire at a bit higher pressure than normal.  Probably around 35 psi.  I don’t like to run a grippy tire with low pressure as they tend to get squirmy and can cause some Stan’s burpage in hard cornering or when negotiating some of our infamous rock washes.

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This tire is pretty good.  Despite the 900+ gram weight, it rolled well on the pavement.  It’s super hairy with all the little rubber things sticking out, so I could tell it was not very efficient in the air resistance department.  Geoff Kabush is a big proponent of running low tread tires in order to reduce air resistance over the knobs. 

I was relentless on this tire today and pushed it hard.  It never lost grip except on some large gravel/small rocks that started to roll as I leaned the tire.  I think it might do even better on the rear, especially for single speeding.  It has a lot of bite.

So for those looking for big traction, the Stout is a good choice.  If WTB were to beef this tire up a bit more in the casing, I would point to this tire as a good choice for downhill racing on the 29er.

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